The one thing we love about a convenience store is, well, they're convenient.

You're in a hurry so you pull on in, fill up with gas and stop inside. You might pick out a soda, some chips or maybe even a burrito or personal size pizza. And you step on over to the microwave, pop it open and then you see it.

The sign.

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Please don't warm your urine in our microwave.

Ah, ok. I might just put that burrito back. I just lost my appetite. And yes, I'm serious. I guess they have that problem down in Florida.

According to an article I saw on the Orlando Sentinel website, A convenience store owner in the Jacksonville area is getting tired of people bringing their urine into his store, popping it into the microwave, warming it up nicely and then 'See ya'. (See, how'd you like to put that burrito into the microwave after watching that?)

The owner says there are two drug testing labs within walking distance of his store and, well, OK I guess it is a 'convenience' store.

He says a woman got aggressive with him recently when he asked her to please not warm her urine in his store's microwave. She got all persnickety and said there was no sign saying she couldn't warm her pee in that microwave!

So he went ahead and made one.

So yes if you happen to be in the Jacksonville area for some rest and relaxation and stop for some gas and maybe a snack, you could well see a sign that says something to the effect of 'Please Keep Your Urine To Yourself'.

And enjoy that burrito.

Here Are The 7 Remaining Drive-In Theaters In South Dakota

If you were born last century...you know, in the nineteen hundreds (ugh)...you may have spent a summer evening in the car watching movies. I don't mean on your phone, I mean at the drive-in movie theater!

If you were in Sioux Falls in the 1970s and '80's you may remember seeing Jaws and Indiana Jones at The East Park or the Starlite Drive-In. Both drive-ins opened just after World War 2. The East Park didn't make it out of the '70s, closing in 1978. The Starlite survived long enough to see the birth of home video, closing in 1985.


Drive-in movies had a bit of a resurgence during the pandemic. They were a way to go out and do something social without getting out of your car.

If you tried one during that time, or you remember the fun of a warm summer evening watching movies on that giant screen there are still places in South Dakota and around Sioux Falls you can do it.